99lions:

William Horton
Close-up of the Ice Cave near Bandera Volcano close to Grants, New Mexico.

99lions:

William Horton

Close-up of the Ice Cave near Bandera Volcano close to Grants, New Mexico.


1 year ago with 15,143 notes
originally kristijxo
paganblood:

Habetrot is the Celtic Goddess of Spinning and Healing. She is able to spin wool into garments in an instant, and the clothes that she makes give the wearer immunity from all disease. In fairy tales, she is depicted with an extended lower lip, which she got from wetting the wool as she spun it.

paganblood:

Habetrot is the Celtic Goddess of Spinning and Healing. She is able to spin wool into garments in an instant, and the clothes that she makes give the wearer immunity from all disease. In fairy tales, she is depicted with an extended lower lip, which she got from wetting the wool as she spun it.


1 year ago with 61 notes
originally paganblood

Continued Blog Hiatus

image

Starting the first week of January, regular posting will resume. If anyone wants to see a particular country’s folklore, please message me with the country name, and I will post that country’s folklore for the month of January.

(Source: google.com)


amarantines:

Circe Invidiosa by John William Waterhouse, 1892
I swear, EVERY Circe painting that Waterhouse did, I think of Malik. I’m not entirely sure why, but I just want to hug everything.

amarantines:

Circe Invidiosa by John William Waterhouse, 1892

I swear, EVERY Circe painting that Waterhouse did, I think of Malik. I’m not entirely sure why, but I just want to hug everything.


1 year ago with 17 notes
originally amarantines

The Magic Circle (1886) by John William Waterhouse

The Magic Circle (1886) by John William Waterhouse


1 year ago with 13 notes
originally c0lmillos

A Mermaid - John William Waterhouse, 1901

A Mermaid - John William Waterhouse, 1901


1 year ago with 14 notes
originally colouratura
cherry-reds, thanks for the follow.

cherry-reds, thanks for the follow.


1 year ago with 1 note
pansgrotto:

A statue of Pan, at Wisley Gardens, in the UK.

pansgrotto:

A statue of Pan, at Wisley Gardens, in the UK.

1 year ago with 5,096 notes
originally pansgrotto
birdsofrhiannon:

A Brownie is a legendary creature popular in folklore around Scotland and England. Brownies are said to inhabit houses and aid in tasks around the house. However, they do not like to be seen and will only work at night, traditionally in exchange for small gifts or food. Among food, they especially enjoy porridge and honey. They usually abandon the house if their gifts are called payments, or if the owners of the house misuse them. Brownies make their homes in an unused part of the house. 
§ illustration: The Brownie by John Patience

birdsofrhiannon:

A Brownie is a legendary creature popular in folklore around Scotland and England. Brownies are said to inhabit houses and aid in tasks around the house. However, they do not like to be seen and will only work at night, traditionally in exchange for small gifts or food. Among food, they especially enjoy porridge and honey. They usually abandon the house if their gifts are called payments, or if the owners of the house misuse them. Brownies make their homes in an unused part of the house.

§ illustration: The Brownie by John Patience


1 year ago with 295 notes
originally birdsofrhiannon
zaeph, thanks for the follow.

zaeph, thanks for the follow.


1 year ago with 5 notes
The red string of fate, also referred to as the red thread of destiny, red thread of fate, and other variants, is an East Asian belief originating from Chinese legend and is also used in Japanese legend. According to this myth, the gods tie an invisible red string around the ankles of those that are destined to meet each other in a certain situation or help each other in a certain way. Often, in Japanese culture, it is thought to be tied around thelittle finger. According to Chinese legend, the deity in charge of “the red thread” is believed to be Yuè Xià Lǎo (月下老, often abbreviated to “Yuèlǎo” [月老]), the old lunar matchmaker god who is also in charge of marriages.
The two people connected by the red thread are destined lovers, regardless of time, place, or circumstances. This magical cord may stretch or tangle, but never break. This myth is similar to the Western concept of soulmates or a destined flame.
One story featuring the red string of fate involves a young boy. Walking home one night, a young boy sees an old man standing beneath the moonlight (Yue Xia Lao). The man explains to the boy that he is attached to his destined wife by a red thread. Yue Xia Lao shows the boy the young girl who is destined to be his wife. Being young and having no interest in having a wife, the young boy picks up a rock and throws it at the girl, running away. Many years later, when the boy has grown into a young man, his parents arrange a wedding for him. On the night of his wedding, his wife waits for him in their bedroom, with the traditional veil covering her face. Raising it, the man is delighted to find that his wife is one of the great beauties of his village. However, she wears an adornment on her eyebrow. He asks her why she wears it and she responds that when she was a young girl, a boy threw a rock at her that struck her, leaving a scar on her eyebrow. She self-consciously wears the adornment to cover it up. The woman is, in fact, the same young girl connected to the man by the red thread shown to him by Yue Xia Lao back in his childhood, showing that they were connected by the red string of fate.

The red string of fate, also referred to as the red thread of destinyred thread of fate, and other variants, is an East Asian belief originating from Chinese legend and is also used in Japanese legend. According to this myth, the gods tie an invisible red string around the ankles of those that are destined to meet each other in a certain situation or help each other in a certain way. Often, in Japanese culture, it is thought to be tied around thelittle finger. According to Chinese legend, the deity in charge of “the red thread” is believed to be Yuè Xià Lǎo (月下老, often abbreviated to “Yuèlǎo” [月老]), the old lunar matchmaker god who is also in charge of marriages.

The two people connected by the red thread are destined lovers, regardless of time, place, or circumstances. This magical cord may stretch or tangle, but never break. This myth is similar to the Western concept of soulmates or a destined flame.

One story featuring the red string of fate involves a young boy. Walking home one night, a young boy sees an old man standing beneath the moonlight (Yue Xia Lao). The man explains to the boy that he is attached to his destined wife by a red thread. Yue Xia Lao shows the boy the young girl who is destined to be his wife. Being young and having no interest in having a wife, the young boy picks up a rock and throws it at the girl, running away. Many years later, when the boy has grown into a young man, his parents arrange a wedding for him. On the night of his wedding, his wife waits for him in their bedroom, with the traditional veil covering her face. Raising it, the man is delighted to find that his wife is one of the great beauties of his village. However, she wears an adornment on her eyebrow. He asks her why she wears it and she responds that when she was a young girl, a boy threw a rock at her that struck her, leaving a scar on her eyebrow. She self-consciously wears the adornment to cover it up. The woman is, in fact, the same young girl connected to the man by the red thread shown to him by Yue Xia Lao back in his childhood, showing that they were connected by the red string of fate.


1 year ago with 18 notes

Blog Hiatus

I apologize for being absent from this blog for so long. This year has seen me pretty busy with college, and daily life, although coming this December I will go back to posting regularly. The college semester ends around the second week into December, that is when regular posting will begin again. I do not have a Country of Origin for the month, so I will take requests as to what folklore my followers want to see. Please send requests, it would be appreciated.

(Source: uploads8.wikipaintings.org)


1 year ago with 1 note
mirroir:

Marginalia of the earliest known illustrated example of a witch on a broomstick in the 1451 manuscript, Hexenflug der Vaudoises (Flight of the Witches), authored by Martin Le France (1410-1461).

mirroir:

Marginalia of the earliest known illustrated example of a witch on a broomstick in the 1451 manuscript, Hexenflug der Vaudoises (Flight of the Witches), authored by Martin Le France (1410-1461).


1 year ago with 332 notes
originally heracliteanfire
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